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Press Trump To Resign Ahead Of Senate Trial

Democratic activists, determined to avoid the President being acquitted in a Senate trial, are coming up with creative new ways to stall impeachment before it ends up in the hands of Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-KY). So far, they’ve suggested withholding the articles of impeachment from the Senate until Republicans agree to their terms, and, in one particularly strange interview, forcing the Senate Majority Leader to recuse himself from the situation altogether.

But Democratic activist Scott Dworkin may have the most bizarre idea of all: implore President Donald Trump to resign ahead of a Senate impeachment trial in order to avoid being removed from office, a scenario that is nearly as unlikely as Trump voluntarily stepping down from office.

Dworkin tried to appeal to the President’s love of social media fame.

“You can still stop your impeachment from happening, Democratic Coalition co-founder Scott Dworkin tweeted. “All you have to do is resign,” the activist tweeted. “And I bet if you tweeted out your resignation, it would be the most shared tweet of all time,” Dworkin goaded. “Wouldn’t that be worth it? Think of all the retweets and likes. Do it.”

Newsweek reported breathlessly on the possibility Wednesday, noting that he would not be the first president to avoid the long-term effects of impeachment by leaving office just in the nick of time.

“As President Donald Trump faces impeachment in a historic vote likely to take place on Wednesday, Democrats are reminding the U.S. leader that there is still another way forward: resigning,” according to the outlet. “While the circumstances are significantly different from those of 1974, if Trump did offer his resignation ahead of the looming impeachment vote, he would not be the first to do so.”

They even granted an interview to Dw0rkin: “Speaking with Newsweek on Wednesday morning, Dworkin said he believes that resigning would be ‘the smartest move’ for Trump to make ‘for his family, his future and his name.’”

This all assumes that Trump will be impeached on more than a party line vote, and that the Senate will vote to remove him from office — both very outside possibilities. As Newsweek notes, too, the circumstances of Trump’s impeachment are very different from those that surrounded Nixon and Clinton.

For starters, Trump has not been charged with any criminal wrongdoing either within or apart from the articles of impeachment drafted by House Democrats. At the core of the two charges, Trump is guilty, basically, of not listening to the wise and direct counsel of his Democratic betters. In the case of the Democrats’ “obstruction of Congress” charge, it’s not even clear Trump wasn’t within his rights to order his aides to refuse Congressional subpoenas; the issue is still under litigation and it could be years before the Supreme Court hears the case, or lower courts conclusively determine Trump went outside the bounds of “executive privilege” when making the proclamation.

But Democrats are dealing with a difficult situation: now that they’ve decided to pursue impeachment, they must follow the process through to its conclusion, with all the electoral and political risks the path entails.

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